The Results Are In

blind-tasting-results

Wines poured for the blind tasting:

1. Sauvignon Blanc, Lake County, Hess, 2007 ($9.99)
2. Bourgongne, “La Foret,” Joseph Drouhin, 2007 ($11.99)
3. Chardonnay, Koonunga Hill, South Australia, Penfolds, 2007 ($9.99)
4. Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley, Honig, 2008 ($13.99)

The results: He guessed #1 and #2 correctly. Half right. Half wrong.

He Said: On all steps I guessed #1 SB, #2 Chard, #3 SB #4 Chard. On the notes I scribbled, “Positive #2 is chard. Questioning #4. Don’t like #1. Prefer 3 to all of them. Questioning #3.”
When she got home she poured me a glass and right away I knew it was chardonnay. Not sure what went wrong on #3 & #4.
When we came up with this idea I said I wanted a chard and an SB vis-a-vis, not 4 wines on the table. And, it should be noted that she was super hungry when she got home and was making and eating food while preparing the test. I said loudly while I was sequestered in the bathroom, “Make sure you mark each one so you know which is which”. Well, when I asked for the results, she was flummoxed and couldn’t remember which was which. So, I’m totally disputing the outcome.
I think this shit was fixed.
Postscript: SB #1 is really gross, it smells like hot wet trash. I’m over wine, get me a beer.

She said: Easy there, Angry.
True, I was starving and was snacking and then got a little confused about which wine was which. But this was resolved quickly–I can taste and smell the difference.
How I chose the wine: I wanted a combination of different areas and styles for both grapes. I’m familiar with all four bottles and knew that like varietals would be slightly different from each other.
Getting half right is fine. I find it interesting that He doubted himself on the two He got incorrect. Trust your instincts, Boy.
As for picking the favorite, #3, it is NOT ACCEPTABLE to write: “Don’t care why…” He must begin to differentiate the smells, textures, and flavors that suit His palate. This is the point.

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